Tag Archives: etiquette

Featured Article

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October is one of my favorite months with the Exceeding Expectations kids.  As you all know, our top priority for the kids is, and always will be, education. That said, every October we participate in two athletic events that I feel are significant in laying the groundwork necessary for them to be successful in the academic world and in their adult lives.  The first of these events is the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) triathlon, aptly called “The Best Day in Triathlon.” Here’s a brief overview from their website:  “In 1994, three friends started a triathlon fundraiser to help one man regain his independence after a tragic accident left him a quadriplegic. From one came many, and Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) took root in the belief that sports and an active lifestyle are a pathway to more in life. Since that fundraiser 25 years ago, CAF has been committed to breaking the financial barrier that individuals with physical challenges face to participate in sports and live a healthy and active lifestyle.”  Participating alongside challenged athletes in a very tough race gives our kids an additional perspective on their own lives. The racers on the course with them face obstacles that they

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5 Travel Tips on Singapore, By Author and Traveler Chris Guillebeau

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Chris Guillebeau is among a small but growing community of folks who have taken the road “less traveled” by opting out of the 9-to-5 office career and making a living through full-time travel. Guillebeau’s on-the-road entrepreneur ventures have ranged from exporting Jamaican coffee, founding a publishing business in Africa, to authoring the bestselling book, The Art of Nonconformity. He’s been featured in The New York Times and Business Week, and he also writes for CNN, the Huffington Post, as well as his own travel blog. So besides the fact that Chris Guillebeau leads an enviable life of full-time travel, what makes the guy so special? Because he’s built an existence around the philosophy of non-conformity. “You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to,” Guillebeau advises. His inspirations and instructions for leading an unconventional life, changing the world, and achieving personal goals are followed by people all over the world. Chris Guillebeau has traveled, communicating the gospel of non-conformity, to 150 countries and counting. We’re delighted to help keep Guillebeau connected along the way. “Boingo is helping a lot with my worldwide travels,” he recently told us. “I had no idea you guys had so many hotspots.” One place

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Zagat Guide Re-Defines Rules of Dining Etiquette


Tim Zagat, co-founder of dining and entertainment Zagat guides, says it’s time to establish new dining etiquette. As we read through the list, we keep wondering: how do these rules apply in different countries worldwide? Seasoned travelers, what are some region-specific dining etiquette that you’ve encountered? Here’s a summary of Zagat’s “10 New Rules of Dining Etiquette:” Men and women deserve equal service quality. According to Zagat, most diners  think men receive better service because they’re perceived as the bill payers. The person who invites pays the bill unless an agreement made in advance says otherwise. Whoever is ready first orders first. The Emily Post tradition is women order first. Fiddling with any gadget (e.g., a smartphone) is bad manners. Do not bring children to non-relevant restaurants (e.g., romantic places). Dress casually, the way they do in Los Angeles. Let the restaurant know if you can’t make it for a reservation. Enjoy yourself, but don’t overstay if there’s a line of people waiting to dine. Chivalry is dead except for the act of door-opening: men should open doors and women should let them. Customers should expect good food and service. Short of that, they have every right to be disappointed and tell all

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The Culture of Internet Surfing on the Toilet and Everywhere Else

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Have you ever used your phone and/or laptop while, ahem, using the restroom? If you’re worried that chatting, texting, emailing, and surfing while on the can is socially unacceptable, then worry no more! According to a recent Intel study on technology etiquette, 75% of U.S. survey responders feel “it is perfectly appropriate to use Internet-enabled devices, including laptops, netbooks and cell phones, in the bathroom.” (Never mind the germs!) But you’re not quite off the hook when it comes to mobile usage in public situations: 69% of respondents feel that “checking e-mails, sending text messages and making phone calls while in the company of others, are unacceptable.” To be frank, I employ a mixed approach to mobile etiquette. I text and surf the Internet on my smartphone while in the company of friends, family, and colleagues. But I rarely answer phone calls while in the company of anyone (unless it’s an emergency), and I turn off my phone entirely when in a business meeting. However, I find it irritating to be in the company of people, including my friends, who constantly text, surf, and talk on their phones. Clearly, we are in need of some hard, fast rules, and Anna

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Etiquette in Travel

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I seem to travel non-stop for work these days. Sometimes it’s hard—travel delays, anyone?—but most of the time you find a rhythm, responding to e-mails in hotel lobbies, working on a proposal in an airport terminal or—if you’re me—writing thank-you notes on a tray table during a flight. This kind of flexible work style functions best when you have convenient services and places to keep you in your groove. From easy-to-use WiFi in airports to credit card machines in taxis (thank you New York City!), hotels and airports are adapting to serve working travelers. It’s why Hyatt Place Hotels and I created a website for business professionals — www.TheEtiquetteEffect.com. There are so many etiquette questions about how to handle yourself (and your technology) when working on the road—questions that have answers which will make you more confident and successful. One of my favorite travel questions is how to ask for an upgrade. You know it’s worth asking, but you also know you have to strike the right tone—it’s all in the how. (So much of etiquette is, as it turns out.) You want the person you’re asking to want to help you. The key here is never to bluster or