Tag Archives: Cherie Gruenfeld

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It’s time to celebrate—Boingo style! We’ve been awarded our eighth Global Traveler award for “Best WiFi Service” and to celebrate we’re kicking off 8 Days of Giveaways to give our awesome fans the chance to win a VIP travel tech kit. This kit is loaded with all the tech essentials you need on the go—like earbuds, a phone charger, flash drive and of course free Boingo Wi-Fi for a year with access to more than a million hotspots around the globe. Join in on the celebration! To enter our 8 Days of Giveaways, head to Twitter and simply tweet @boingo what YOU are celebrating this year using the hashtag #BoingoCelebr8. Whether it’s a milestone birthday, a big client win, running your first marathon or something else, we want to hear your reason for raising a glass. Boingo’s 8 Days of Giveaways will run December 8-15, 2017. One winner will be announced each day.    

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Age, Determination, and the Olympics: An Interview With Resident Butt Kicker, Cherie Gruenfeld

This week, the world watched in wonder as 12-time Olympic medalist Dara Torres attempted to make her record sixth Olympic team at the jaw-dropping age of 45. While she just missed qualifying – finishing fourth with a time of 24.82 – her performance was nonetheless staggering. It got me thinking about our Resident Butt Kicker, Cherie Gruenfeld, who at the age of 68 continues to compete at the highest levels of Ironman competition. What, I wondered, is the secret to these athletes for whom age appears to be nothing more than a number? Here’s a snapshot of my conversation with Cherie. Continue reading

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Got 2012 New Year’s Goals? 4 Tips To Stay Tenacious and Turn Those Goals Into Reality

“It is never too late to be what you might have been.” -George Eliot, English novelist The holiday parties are over. We now find ourselves back in the office and back in the old routine. But remember when the clock struck midnight on the 31st? I’m guessing you raised a glass of the bubbly, made a toast to the new year, and declared something along the lines of, “May 2012 be the best ever!” Well, how’s that going for you so far? Making 2012 the best year ever won’t happen simply because you proclaimed it. It only becomes a reality when you define what will make 2012 “the best year” and then set the goals to make it happen. As you might have guessed, I have a few thoughts on how to accomplish your goals: 1. Write Down Your Goals Thinking about what you want to accomplish is far less effective than putting it in writing. There is plenty of evidence that the act of writing down goals and regularly looking at them result in a stronger commitment to the goals and serves to keep one on track towards meeting his goals. 2. Personalize Your Goals Goals have to be yours –

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When You Hit the *Can’t* Roadblock, Find the *Can* Routes

It’s September, and the Ironman World Championship in Kona is four weeks away. Since 1992, my priority each August and September is final preparation for “The Big Show” in  Kona. I put in mega miles in the desert heat and build confidence in my ability to perform well in the treacherous Hawaiian conditions. This year is entirely different. My 2011 Kona dream was derailed with a bike crash in early July that resulted in a badly broken collar bone. Through surgery and the follow-on rehab, I maintained hope that I could get back to the IM Championships to defend my title. But that was not to be. I am recovering, but the smart move is to give it more time to fully heal. To do otherwise would jeopardize my long-term ability to perform well and I’m not ready to retire yet. I believe I still have some game. Let me share some thoughts on the last six weeks: Several days post-surgery I started feeling like my “old self” which means I put my bike on the indoor trainer and did some riding. I  felt like I was making progress. A week after surgery, I had my first post-op appointment and

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Stuff Happens: Tips on Overcoming Setbacks

Turns out, boulders and shoulders don’t mix. Our resident butt-kicker and 10-time Ironman World Championships Age Group champion Cherie Gruenfeld found that out the hard way during a recent early-morning training ride. Head down in the aero position, cranking away at 6:30AM, she didn’t see the landscaping boulder that had fallen into the bike path.  Until she hit it. Let’s just say the boulder won. A broken clavicle and four broken ribs later, Cherie now finds herself in the position no athlete wants to be in: Evaluating their racing season and asking themselves, “What next?” As expected, Cherie has some great insight on what to do when things don’t exactly go your way. It’s a beautiful summer day. My next planned event, the 70.3 (Half Ironman) World Championships, is 6 weeks out. Today my training schedule calls for a 50-mile bike ride followed by an 8-mile run. But instead of “enjoying” that workout, I’m sitting here trying to adjust to my new future. As the old saying goes, “If you want to see God laugh, make a plan.” Two weeks ago, I crashed while doing a bike ride, breaking my collar bone and several ribs. Clearly the 70.3 Championships are

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Boingo Kit Triumphs In Hawaii (With A Little Help From Cherie)

I wish I could say I get tired of watching Cherie Gruenfeld smash her competition.  But I don’t.  And I love it all the more now that she races in a Boingo kit! I asked Cherie for an update about her last race; below is her summary.  My favorite line?  “I loved it.” “I recently returned from Kona on the big island of Hawaii where I competed in a race called Honu 70.3. This is a Half Ironman distance race (Swim 1.2 miles/ Bike 56 miles / Run 13.1 miles). If you’ve seen the Ironman World Championships on NBC, you’ve watched athletes struggling through the brutal Hawaiian conditions. These same elements played a major role in this day of racing regardless of the fact that the distance is just half the Ironman distance. The swim, in the beautiful blue Pacific, is fraught with currents and waves as the result of strong winds. The bike course is part of the fabled Ironman bike course so we enjoyed the same strong cross-winds while attemptine to stay upright on our bikes. And during the run we had to negotiate the ups and downs of the Mauna Lani golf course along with some road