Tag Archives: New York Times

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October is one of my favorite months with the Exceeding Expectations kids.  As you all know, our top priority for the kids is, and always will be, education. That said, every October we participate in two athletic events that I feel are significant in laying the groundwork necessary for them to be successful in the academic world and in their adult lives.  The first of these events is the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) triathlon, aptly called “The Best Day in Triathlon.” Here’s a brief overview from their website:  “In 1994, three friends started a triathlon fundraiser to help one man regain his independence after a tragic accident left him a quadriplegic. From one came many, and Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) took root in the belief that sports and an active lifestyle are a pathway to more in life. Since that fundraiser 25 years ago, CAF has been committed to breaking the financial barrier that individuals with physical challenges face to participate in sports and live a healthy and active lifestyle.”  Participating alongside challenged athletes in a very tough race gives our kids an additional perspective on their own lives. The racers on the course with them face obstacles that they

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Is Fitness in the Genes? It’s an Irrelevant Question

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The New York Times recently published an article which asked the question: Is fitness all in the genes? The article discusses a study which found that there are genes associated with people’s response to aerobic exercise. Although not mentioned in the piece, this study falls on the heels of another which found a gene that predisposes people to physical activity versus sedentary ones like sitting on the couch. Now, I’m all for science. We can learn wonderful things from research and sometimes there’s an immediate practical application. But there’s a case to be made for studies of this sort being kept under wraps. Here’s what I mean: It’s no secret that some of us like physical activity more than others. There are some of us who go nuts without it and there are some who will fight it to the death. And if there were a guarantee that we’d all turn into physical studs/studettes through exercise, more people would simply suck it up, do the work and wait for the results. But, again, it’s no secret – that may or may not happen. Everybody responds differently. So, a study that presents a reason for our lack of desire to exercise

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The Bits and Bytes of Nick Bilton, Lead Writer for the NY Times Tech Blog


Nick Bilton – I Live in the Future & Here’s How it Works from Nick Bilton on Vimeo. Nick Bilton, lead writer and technology reporter for the Bits Blog at the New York Times, rebels against the idea that technology and the Internet are rotting our brains. In his book, I Live in the Future & Here’s How it Works, Nick presents a history of technophobia and doomsday predictions to exemplify that humans have always had a natural resistance to change. However, once we overcome our fears and adapt to new technologies, our brains evolve in positive ways. Recently, we had the opportunity to chat with Nick over coffee to learn some additional information about his new book, as well as a few of his personal quirks. Here’s our interview with Nick Bilton: What was your primary impetus for writing this book? I kept hearing all these things about how technology is negative for society and the next generation. As someone who has grown up with computers, I just knew that wasn’t the case. That’s why I stepped up and did the research for the book. I wanted to defend technology and the Internet. In your book, you say that

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Traveling Abroad? Avoid a Hefty Phone Bill With These Tips


A few years ago, when I was just a little grasshopper, I went overseas with my smartphone. While I didn’t make any calls, I did continue to receive push email. Imagine my shock when the phone bill arrived a few weeks later with a $700+ balance. Smartphones are now a pervasive part of our everyday lives — so much so that we get separation anxiety when we leave our devices at home. The unhealthy implications of this aside, there are very practical reasons to bring along a smartphone when traveling: navigation, eatery recommendations, phone calls, etc. So what’s a traveler married to his/her smartphone to do? The New York Times provides a helpful guide for reaping the benefits of smartphone travel without incurring hefty bills: Get a GSM phone Check with your carrier for special deals on international roaming Buy a local SIM card Subscribe to Boingo Mobile Wi-Fi for $7.95 for online connectivity and to make VoIP calls Buy an old-fashioned calling card I’ve employed all the above tips and am happy to say I’ve not since been faced with an exorbitant communications bill. (That means extra money for fun stuff, e.g., clothes and shoes, while I’m in a

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America: It’s Hip to Be Geeky

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Jenna Wortham of the New York Times reports on a recent Forrester Research study about how technology has gone mainstream in America: “For decades, the adoption and use of the latest technologies was limited to a subculture: Whether called “tech enthusiasts” or “gadget geeks,” the implication was that most of the world got along fine with older, established products and services, while a smaller group pursued the most leading-edge technology. But according to a study released Wednesday by Forrester Research, a marketing firm based in Cambridge, Mass., a shift has taken place. What used to be the pursuit of a few has become decidedly mainstream. We’re all gadget geeks now. According to the study, which surveyed 53,668 households in the United States and Canada by mail, half of all American adults are gamers. Sixty-three percent of American households have a broadband Internet connection. Three-quarters of American households have cellphones and PCs. And nearly 10 million American households, out of nearly 118 million, added an HDTV in the last year, a jump of 27 percent over 2007. Already, Mr. Golvin says, more people are migrating away from the home and office to use the Web and turning toward their smartphones. About