Tag Archives: Alexander the Great

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I finished my season three weeks ago, but that didn’t mean I had no more events on the calendar. In fact, my schedule was loaded with trips and events. First off was an Olympic race in Santa Barbara. Then we’d be off to Kona – not to race this year, but as spectators. We planned to hurry home from the Big Island in time to participate in the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) event in San Diego, followed by the Tram Challenge in Palm Springs the week after. And the list of activities went on and on. But those plans came to a screeching halt in the blink of an eye. Remember that Olympic race in Santa Barbara? Well, that’s where the unraveling began with a bike collision one mile from T2. Fortunately, the other rider was unharmed. Me…. not so much. I’m sitting here today with four fractures in my pelvis, which means no weight-bearing for 4-6 weeks. If you are an athlete or live with one, you know that hearing this is like a death sentence. Now, this most certainly is an exaggeration, but in the first moments after hearing these words, that’s what it feels like. And, in

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10 Travel-Themed Books


What do books and travel have in common? Both experiences offer an escape from everyday life. So this summer, if you’re unable to take a holiday (or one that is long enough), why not journey through the pages of a book? Below is a list of travel-themed books guaranteed to transport you to another time and place. Know of other good reads? We need recommendations! The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly: after his mother dies and his father re-marries, a twelve year-old boy journeys through another world, where he encounters the heroes and monsters of well-known fairy tales — but these characters are twisted and flawed, exposing the boy to a new and grittier reality. This is a book about the loss of innocence that comes with the passage into adulthood. A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway: in this brief memoir, Hemingway captures the magic of 1920s Paris, when the city teemed with literary luminaries such as Gertrude Stein, Scott Fitzgerald and James Joyce. The dynamics between Hemingway and his artist peers are colorful and electric, and Hemingway’s characterization of Paris is as relevant today as it was then. The Journeyer by Gary Jennings: reading this book about