Category Archives: Green/Community

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I finished my season three weeks ago, but that didn’t mean I had no more events on the calendar. In fact, my schedule was loaded with trips and events. First off was an Olympic race in Santa Barbara. Then we’d be off to Kona – not to race this year, but as spectators. We planned to hurry home from the Big Island in time to participate in the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF) event in San Diego, followed by the Tram Challenge in Palm Springs the week after. And the list of activities went on and on. But those plans came to a screeching halt in the blink of an eye. Remember that Olympic race in Santa Barbara? Well, that’s where the unraveling began with a bike collision one mile from T2. Fortunately, the other rider was unharmed. Me…. not so much. I’m sitting here today with four fractures in my pelvis, which means no weight-bearing for 4-6 weeks. If you are an athlete or live with one, you know that hearing this is like a death sentence. Now, this most certainly is an exaggeration, but in the first moments after hearing these words, that’s what it feels like. And, in

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When You Hit the *Can’t* Roadblock, Find the *Can* Routes


It’s September, and the Ironman World Championship in Kona is four weeks away. Since 1992, my priority each August and September is final preparation for “The Big Show” in  Kona. I put in mega miles in the desert heat and build confidence in my ability to perform well in the treacherous Hawaiian conditions. This year is entirely different. My 2011 Kona dream was derailed with a bike crash in early July that resulted in a badly broken collar bone. Through surgery and the follow-on rehab, I maintained hope that I could get back to the IM Championships to defend my title. But that was not to be. I am recovering, but the smart move is to give it more time to fully heal. To do otherwise would jeopardize my long-term ability to perform well and I’m not ready to retire yet. I believe I still have some game. Let me share some thoughts on the last six weeks: Several days post-surgery I started feeling like my “old self” which means I put my bike on the indoor trainer and did some riding. I  felt like I was making progress. A week after surgery, I had my first post-op appointment and

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Stuff Happens: Tips on Overcoming Setbacks


Turns out, boulders and shoulders don’t mix. Our resident butt-kicker and 10-time Ironman World Championships Age Group champion Cherie Gruenfeld found that out the hard way during a recent early-morning training ride. Head down in the aero position, cranking away at 6:30AM, she didn’t see the landscaping boulder that had fallen into the bike path.  Until she hit it. Let’s just say the boulder won. A broken clavicle and four broken ribs later, Cherie now finds herself in the position no athlete wants to be in: Evaluating their racing season and asking themselves, “What next?” As expected, Cherie has some great insight on what to do when things don’t exactly go your way. It’s a beautiful summer day. My next planned event, the 70.3 (Half Ironman) World Championships, is 6 weeks out. Today my training schedule calls for a 50-mile bike ride followed by an 8-mile run. But instead of “enjoying” that workout, I’m sitting here trying to adjust to my new future. As the old saying goes, “If you want to see God laugh, make a plan.” Two weeks ago, I crashed while doing a bike ride, breaking my collar bone and several ribs. Clearly the 70.3 Championships are

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Boingo Kit Triumphs In Hawaii (With A Little Help From Cherie)


I wish I could say I get tired of watching Cherie Gruenfeld smash her competition.  But I don’t.  And I love it all the more now that she races in a Boingo kit! I asked Cherie for an update about her last race; below is her summary.  My favorite line?  “I loved it.” “I recently returned from Kona on the big island of Hawaii where I competed in a race called Honu 70.3. This is a Half Ironman distance race (Swim 1.2 miles/ Bike 56 miles / Run 13.1 miles). If you’ve seen the Ironman World Championships on NBC, you’ve watched athletes struggling through the brutal Hawaiian conditions. These same elements played a major role in this day of racing regardless of the fact that the distance is just half the Ironman distance. The swim, in the beautiful blue Pacific, is fraught with currents and waves as the result of strong winds. The bike course is part of the fabled Ironman bike course so we enjoyed the same strong cross-winds while attemptine to stay upright on our bikes. And during the run we had to negotiate the ups and downs of the Mauna Lani golf course along with some road

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CAF Helps Disabled Athletes Get Back Into the Game


Every once in awhile I hear a story that so touches me, I feel the need to share it. In 1985, Jim MacLaren, an all-American defensive tackle, lost a leg in a motorcycle accident. He reinvented himself into an endurance athlete and competed with able-bodied athletes in the Ironman World Championships in 1992, finishing in 10:42. Unfortunately, in 1993, tragedy struck again – a van veered onto the Orange Country Performing Arts triathlon course and struck Jim, who became a quadriplegic. A group of friends in San Diego rallied to raise money and provide emotional support to Jim, who needed to re-configure every aspect of his life to accommodate wheelchair-living. Flash forward to today. What started with a few good friends helping Jim MacLaren has now become the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF). This non-profit organization, whose stated mission is “to provide opportunities and support to people with physical disabilities so they can pursue active lifestyles through physical fitness and competitive athletics,” has raised more than $11 million to help athletes get back into the game. CAF has changed thousands of lives over the years and recently, they took their show on the road. They went to Haiti, where over 2000

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Wild Woman Conquers Wildflower


Our resident butt-kicker has done it again. Cherie Gruenfeld placed first in her age group at the AVIA Wildflower Triathlon this past weekend, besting the 65-69 year-old age group for the Half-Ironman distance.  (She beat the 60-65 year-old women for good measure, too.) Known for a particularly hilly and grueling course – many participants wonder how it is possible for a course to have so much “up” and so little “down” — the AVIA Wildflower Triathlon is one of the largest triathlon events in the world, with 7,500 athletes and 30,000 spectators attending each year.  The event features a 1.2 mile swim in Lake San Antonio, a 56 mile bike ride that includes the notorious “Nasty Grade” — a nearly five mile grade which climbs 1,000 feet (300 m) from bottom to top of “Heart Rate Hill” — and finishes with a 13.1 mile run, more than half of which is done off-road on hiking trails.  It’s a tough, fiendishly difficult course that will test the mettle of any triathlete. Lucky for Cherie, she’s got mettle in spades.  And she’s got medal, too.  A first place medal, that is!  Join us in congratulating Cherie on yet another awesome victory. (P.S. Check out Cherie’s new

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Happy Earth Day 2011!


Happy Earth Day, fellow Earthlings!!! We hope you all are taking a special moment today to honor and appreciate our special planet in whatever small or big way you can! Here at Boingo, we’re very passionate and serious about preserving, healing and respecting the Earth. Our in-office green efforts are guided by the Boingo Green Committee, which meets monthly to monitor the company’s progress on increasing efficiency in a variety of areas. We score our efforts using the Consumer Electronics Association’s (CEA) green assessment guide, and we’re always implementing new methods to improve. We’re proud of our employees for faithfully participating in the various everyday green initiatives at the office. Click here to read more about the green program at Boingo. While Earth Day is a great opportunity to formally celebrate our precious planet, we strive to practice green living each and every day. But there is so much more to be done, which is why we continue to research and learn more about new habits, initiatives and technologies that drive sustainability. Our hope is that more people and organizations across the globe will join us. How do you practice greener living on a daily basis? Here’s how ten members

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Our Favorite Green Tweeps


In celebration of Earth Day on April 22, we’re honoring our favorite green organizations! These folks are superstars at educating the public about environmental issues, providing tips for everyday green living and working to heal the earth. Which green organizations do you follow? SmartPlanet offers environmental news and information across a wide spectrum of intersecting topics, including: technology, business, and life. They have an impressive editorial staff of seasoned writers from well-known publications such as ZDNet, Popular Mechanics, Entrepreneur, Discover Magazine, Nature and the Washington Post. Recently published articles that we enjoyed include “In growing cities, electric motorcycles, scooters to bridge gap” and “Los Angeles could use apartment rooftops for big solar gains.” Twitter handle: @SmartPlanet Join SmartPlanet on Facebook TreeHugger‘s stated aim is to drive “sustainability mainstream.”  The organization has more than delivered on this promise to become one of today’s top-ranked media outlets covering green issues. Their sustainable living philosophy encompasses topics from transportation, science + technology, design + architecture, travel + nature, culture + celebrity, food + health, to business + politics. We particularly enjoy TreeHugger’s vast library of videos (in association with PlanetGreen) that features powerful messages about the negative consequences of global warming and green

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Is Fitness in the Genes? It’s an Irrelevant Question


The New York Times recently published an article which asked the question: Is fitness all in the genes? The article discusses a study which found that there are genes associated with people’s response to aerobic exercise. Although not mentioned in the piece, this study falls on the heels of another which found a gene that predisposes people to physical activity versus sedentary ones like sitting on the couch. Now, I’m all for science. We can learn wonderful things from research and sometimes there’s an immediate practical application. But there’s a case to be made for studies of this sort being kept under wraps. Here’s what I mean: It’s no secret that some of us like physical activity more than others. There are some of us who go nuts without it and there are some who will fight it to the death. And if there were a guarantee that we’d all turn into physical studs/studettes through exercise, more people would simply suck it up, do the work and wait for the results. But, again, it’s no secret – that may or may not happen. Everybody responds differently. So, a study that presents a reason for our lack of desire to exercise

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A Day in My Workout Life


Some of you have asked for a glimpse in the day of my workout life, and I’m happy to oblige. Here is a snapshot of how I balance my work (with Exceeding Expectations) and my workouts: The alarm rings at 5:00 a.m. I take a moment to luxuriate under the warm, cozy covers before tossing them off. By 5:30 I’m in the pool starting a 2500 yard swim, a speed workout consisting of short, fast intervals. Following the swim, I rush home for a quick breakfast and a little computer time, checking new messages that need immediate attention. Having taken care of the necessary business details, I pack up the bike and several gear bags and drive out to my favorite locale for some bike and run speed work. My bike ride includes both short, steep hills and long flat sections perfect for “redline” intervals. This ride takes about an hour and a half and is quickly followed by a run which includes a couple of extreme hills. It’s a short three-mile run but a toughie because it ends with an all-out one mile to the finish. A few minutes of stretching concludes the athletic portion of the day, and

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Need Fitness Motivation? Work Out With a Team.


This Saturday, March 5, a group of Boingo employees will gamely attempt their first triathlon in La Quinta, CA. These are folks who spend hours working as a group towards corporate goals. But this weekend, they’re laying it all out there – as a team – and shooting for personal fitness goals. When I joined the Boingo family, I brought along my belief that everyone can benefit from some sort of fitness program. However, I’m well aware that many folks find it a bit intimidating to start a fitness program. You’ll be happy to know that there’s a very good solution to that problem, and the Boingo folks are an excellent example. Being a part of a group and having a goal upon which the group is committed are two of the best possible motivators for getting into a fitness routine and sticking with it. –  When you’re having an “off” day, someone who’s feeling strong will pull you along. You’ll do the same when it’s your “on” day. –  You always know that others are counting on you: if you commit to meeting at the gym, you’re expected to show up. Whether you feel like getting out of bed